How to Remove a Bathroom Sink
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How to Remove a Bathroom Sink

Before you start most do it yourself projects, you usually have to remove something. When it comes to bathrooms a common, a fairly easy, project is replacing a bathroom sink. Bathroom sinks can be hung directly from the wall, have a pedestal base, or be installed in a vanity or similar cabinet. This article will help the novice do-it-yourselfer tackle this project before it gets too frustrating, expensive, and messy.

Before you start most do it yourself projects, you usually have to remove something. When it comes to bathrooms a common, a fairly easy, project is replacing a bathroom sink. Bathroom sinks can be hung directly from the wall, have a pedestal base, or be installed in a vanity or similar cabinet. This article will help the novice do-it-yourselfer tackle this project before it gets too frustrating, expensive, and messy. You can save a lot of money by doing this plumbing job yourself.

Instructions

Since you won‘t be reusing the sink again, you don’t need to worry too much about the condition of the sink after you are done.  Turn off the water supply valves under the sink and verify that they are working by opening the faucet handles. If any water continues to flow out of the spigot, you will need to shut off the water to the entire home.  Typically the hot supply valve may be more difficult to turn and may pass due to higher levels of dissolved minerals in the water.

Next disconnect the water supply lines from the underside of the sink. Since there is very little room, a special tool called a basin wrench is usually required to reach the fitting on the supply line and loosen it. The spring-loaded jaw will grab the nut when it is twisted in a counterclockwise direction.  If necessary you may need an additional wrench on the square shaft of the basin wrench to provide more torque.

Remove the hot and cold supply lines from the valves with an adjustable wrench.

Disconnect the drain line by loosening the nut with adjustable pliers or a pipe wrench set just below the tailpiece of the sink. Be careful not to crush the nut on the drain line if you plan to reuse the drain. Steel drains may be corroded and difficult to remove so it may be necessary to cut the drain line out with a hacksaw or power reciprocating saw.

With the water and drain lines free, the sink should be able to be lifted off the bracket for wall hung or pedestal units.  Sinks installed in vanities or cabinets may have clips around the underside of the sink that can be removed with a screwdriver. Most sinks set onto countertops are usually just caulked into place.  To remove the sink from the countertop simply run a utility knife around the rim of the sink to cut the caulk and use a putty knife to pry it up.  You can also try pushing up from underneath the basin to break it free from the countertop.

If necessary, you can remove the rest of the trap to a point where it turns horizontal with a pipe wrench or adjustable pliers. Grab the drain line connector nut where it enters the wall and turn counterclockwise. For metal drain lines that are threaded into a fitting, grasp the pipe close to the fitting in the wall with a 24-inch pipe wrench and rotate the entire pipe counterclockwise.

Your bathroom sink is now removed and ready for a new sink, drain line, and water supply lines. Plumbing repairs can be difficult, but with a little patience and a clear plan, you should be able to accomplish this job is an hour or less.

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